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Quick guide to Ibuprofen Oral Drops

Brand Name(s): Infants' Advil, Infants' Motrin, PediaCare Fever

Generic Name Ibuprofen Oral Drops

What are Ibuprofen oral drops?

IBUPROFEN (Infant's Motrin®, Infant's Advil®, PediaCare® Fever) is an antiinflammatory drug. Ibuprofen reduces inflammation and eases mild to moderate pain. It relieves the symptoms of minor aches and pains, headaches, or toothaches. Ibuprofen oral drops also reduce fever, but these products are intended only for infants who are older than 6 months. Generic ibuprofen oral drops are not available.

What should my health care professional know before I receive Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen oral drops are intended for use in infants; however, some of the following conditions may only apply to adults.

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia
  • asthma, especially aspirin sensitive asthma
  • bleeding problems or taking medicines that make you bleed easily such as anticoagulants ('blood thinners')
  • cigarette smoker
  • diabetes
  • drink more than 3 alcohol-containing beverages a day
  • heart failure
  • high blood pressure
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • lost a lot of fluid due to continued vomiting or diarrhea
  • stomach ulcers or pain
  • systemic lupus erythematosus
  • ulcerative colitis
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, other salicylates, other NSAIDs, other medicines, foods, dyes or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should this medicine be used?

Give ibuprofen oral drops by mouth using the dropper provided in the package; do not use any other dosing device. Shake well before using. Fill the dropper to the dose level. Dispense the liquid slowly into the child's mouth, toward the inner cheek. Follow the directions on the label. Use the weight of your child to determine the dose if possible, otherwise use age. Do not give more than directed and doses should not be given more than 4 times a day. If ibuprofen causes stomach upset, it may be given with food.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of ibuprofen oral drops in infants less than 6 months old. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for the next dose, give only that dose. Do not give double or extra doses.

What drug(s) may interact with Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen oral drops are intended for use in infants; however, some of the following drugs may only apply to adults.

  • alcohol
  • anti-inflammatory drugs (other NSAIDs, prednisone)
  • aspirin and aspirin-like medicines
  • cidofovir
  • cyclosporine
  • entecavir
  • herbal products that contain feverfew, garlic, ginger, or ginkgo biloba
  • lithium
  • medicines for high blood pressure
  • medicines that affect platelets
  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots such as warfarin and other 'blood thinners'
  • methotrexate
  • pemetrexed
  • water pills (diuretics)

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What side effects may I notice from receiving Ibuprofen?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • signs of bleeding - bruising, pinpoint red spots on the skin, black tarry stools, blood in the urine, unusual tiredness or weakness
  • signs of an allergic reaction - difficulty breathing or wheezing, skin rash, redness, blistering or peeling skin, hives, or itching, swelling of eyelids, throat, lips
  • blurred vision
  • change in the amount of urine passed
  • difficulty swallowing, severe heartburn or burning, pain in throat
  • pain or difficulty passing urine
  • stomach pain or cramps
  • swelling of feet or ankles
  • vomiting blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea
  • dizziness, drowsiness
  • gas or heartburn
  • headache
  • nausea, vomiting

What should I watch for while taking Ibuprofen?

Let your prescriber or health care professional know if your pain continues, do not take with other pain medicines or fever medicine without advice. In children, if the fever or pain gets worse, lasts for more than 3 days, or there is no relief of symptoms within the first day (24 hours), contact your health care provider. You may be covering up a more serious illness. If stomach pain or upset gets worse or continues, if redness or swelling occur in the painful area, or if new symptoms appear, contact your health care provider.

Severe or persistent sore throat or sore throat accompanied by high fever, nausea, and vomiting may be serious. Consult your health care provider promptly if your child has these symptoms. Do not use for more than 2 days or give to children under 3 years of age with these symptoms unless directed by your health care provider.

Discuss the use of this medicine with your health care provider if your child has not been drinking fluids, has lost a lot of fluid due to continued vomiting or diarrhea, has stomach pain, or has problems or serious side effects from taking fever reducers or pain medicine.

Where can I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 °C (68 and 77 °F). Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


(Note: The above information is not intended to replace the advice of your physician, pharmacist, or other healthcare professional. It is not meant to indicate that the use of the product is safe, appropriate, or effective for you.)

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